George Kennard Glassworks

GEORGE KENNARD GLASS

ABOUT THE ARTIST

ABOUT THE ARTIST

As a glass artist, I enjoy making large-scale pieces because it's a challenge and you really need to rely on a team for the effort.

George Kennard appreciates the limitless opportunities of manipulating molten glass. Having blown glass since 1990, Kennard has come to favor creating massive incalmo works, a technique that joins two blown glass bubbles to make different bands of color. He is especially well-known for his fantastically large sculptures, including a life-sized snow family and the world’s largest glass pumpkin. “As a glass artist,” Kennard explains, “I enjoy making large-scale pieces because it’s a challenge and you really need to rely on a team for the effort.” 

 

For the past 20 years, Kennard has worked with renowned Scottish glass artist Eric Hilton. Using the Swedish Graal technique, the men create glass layers that are carved, shaped, encased in clear glass, and then further refined. Graal is Swedish for Grail—as in Holy Grail—and the resultant objects of this refined high level glass blowing take on transcendant qualities.

 

In his current role as Hot Glass Mobile Team Leader at the Corning Museum of Glass, Kennard has worked with teams of up to 10 glassblowers to create some of his most notable large-scale works. He appreciates the collaborative opportunities and assets that Corning Glass offers, noting that “the Museum is a great source of inspiration with the vast collection it has and the resources at the Studio.” After spending eleven years working in private studios, Kennard began his tenure at the Corning Museum in 2001 by teaching beginning and intermediate classes in glassblowing as an instructor in The Studio. His work at the Museum has since expanded to being part of the Hot Glass Team, where he assists glassmaking demonstrations both onsite and abroad through the Mobile Hot Shop.

 

At Corning Glass, Kennard has also been able to collaborate with distinguished artists, such as renowned 11th generation Italian glassblower Davide Salvadore and influential American modernist metal sculptor Albert Paley, and Pueblo artist Virgil Ortiz who was awarded the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture’s 2022 Living Treasure award. The popular Netflix series “Blown Away” also featured Kennard in every one of their three season finales.


With a penchant and a knack for making larger-than-life objects come to life, Kennard is a Museum crowd favorite. He led a team of gaffers to add a whimsical glass snow dog to the large-as-life snow family. In 2016, he also wowed audiences both in-person and online when his intricate four-and-a-half-foot tall dragon stem goblet was featured on Corning’s 2300° event. You never know what Kennard will be making next, but you know it will define spectacular!

 

George Kennard appreciates the limitless opportunities of manipulating molten glass. Having blown glass since 1990, Kennard has come to favor creating massive incalmo works, a technique that joins two blown glass bubbles to make different bands of color. He is especially well-known for his fantastically large sculptures, including a life-sized snow family and the world’s largest glass pumpkin. “As a glass artist,” Kennard explains, “I enjoy making large-scale pieces because it’s a challenge and you really need to rely on a team for the effort.” 

 

For the past 20 years, Kennard has worked with renowned Scottish glass artist Eric Hilton. Using the Swedish Graal technique, the men create glass layers that are carved, shaped, encased in clear glass, and then further refined. Graal is Swedish for Grail—as in Holy Grail—and the resultant objects of this refined high level glass blowing take on transcendant qualities.

 

In his current role as Hot Glass Mobile Team Leader at the Corning Museum of Glass, Kennard has worked with teams of up to 10 glassblowers to create some of his most notable large-scale works. He appreciates the collaborative opportunities and assets that Corning Glass offers, noting that “the Museum is a great source of inspiration with the vast collection it has and the resources at the Studio.” After spending eleven years working in private studios, Kennard began his tenure at the Corning Museum in 2001 by teaching beginning and intermediate classes in glassblowing as an instructor in The Studio. His work at the Museum has since expanded to being part of the Hot Glass Team, where he assists glassmaking demonstrations both onsite and abroad through the Mobile Hot Shop.

 

At Corning Glass, Kennard has also been able to collaborate with distinguished artists, such as renowned 11th generation Italian glassblower Davide Salvadore and influential American modernist metal sculptor Albert Paley, and Pueblo artist Virgil Ortiz who was awarded the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture’s 2022 Living Treasure award. The popular Netflix series “Blown Away” also featured Kennard in every one of their three season finales.

 

With a penchant and a knack for making larger-than-life objects come to life, Kennard is a Museum crowd favorite. He led a team of gaffers to add a whimsical glass snow dog to the large-as-life snow family. In 2016, he also wowed audiences both in-person and online when his intricate four-and-a-half-foot tall dragon stem goblet was featured on Corning’s 2300° event. You never know what Kennard will be making next, but you know it will define spectacular!

WANT TO KNOW EVEN MORE?

Listen to George Kennard on the Connected in Glass Podcast below